Smoky Serenity in Bagan

This is our entry in The WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Serene.

This post highlights another photo shoot in Bagan, Myanmar, with the international award-winning photographer Maung Maung Bagan.  (The first photo shoot is described at Bagan Photo Shoot 1: I need a map.)

This is a temple we visited in the late afternoon. It was locked, but Maung Maung had arranged for a “key man” to let us in for about $4 US.  He had also arranged for the novice Buddhist monk to be our model for another $4. 

We know that there must be particles in the air to capture sun rays in photos.  In the West, either a smoke machine or a can of spray smoke is used to illuminate the sunbeams. These normally come with strict warnings about allergies, safety, etc.  Gavin Hoey, one of our favorite presenters on YouTube, carefully describes these warnings each time smoke is used.  Maung Maung brought small bundles of some kind of dried grass, tossed them in the window behind the little monk, and lit them. The smoke was both photographically effective and choking.  After the shoot, we stood in the window where the monk is seen in the photo. We had difficulty breathing and our eyes watered.  Only then did we realize what we had just put the little novitiate through.

This photo was taken on February 8, 2017. Specs are:

Canon SL1, ISO 1600, f/7.1, 1/80 sec, focal length 18 mm

Neon Boneyard — Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Has the letter “O”

This is our entry in Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Letter O – Needs to have the letter O anywhere in the word.

Two weeks ago, we used the entrance sign of the Neon Museum in Las Vegas, Nevada, for our entry in Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Letter “N”. This week we are publishing a photo of another exhibit in response to the Letter “O” challenge.  The Neon Boneyard features more than 200 rescued and restored neon signs from Las Vegas casinos, hotels, and other businesses.  The one is the sign from the famous, but now defunct,  La Concha Motel.

This photo was taken on October 25, 2017. Specs are:

Olympus TG-4, ISO 200, f/4.4, 1/60 sec, focal length 10.7 mm (35mm-equivalent of about 70 mm)

Three Cheap Shots

We are trying to improve our camera skills during the holidays. Recently, we experimented with cross-polarization using two lens filters (Cross-Polarized Lime) and liked the results, so we wanted to try other experiments. We bought a sheet of polarized film about the size of a sheet of paper and placed it on an old light table we previously used to review slides and negatives (a.k.a. prehistoric pre-digital images). The cheapest possible clear plastic “silverware” was placed on the polarized film in different arrangements. Then, we rotated the polarization filter on the camera so that everything in the frame except the silverware was black.  Here are three of our results.

These photos were taken on November 25, 2017. Specs are:

Canon 100D, ISO 100, f/16, between 0.4 and 0.6 seconds, focal length 24 mm.

Transformation

This is our response to the WordPress weekly challenge Transformation.

In the US, we don’t have much experience with the Buddha Hand Lemon.  We think we have discovered the reason it had not yet become popular. This is illustrated in the following slideshow.

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Neon Boneyard — Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Letter N

This is our entry in Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Letter N – Needs to start with the letter N.

This photo shows the entrance sign for the Neon Museum in Las Vegas, Nevada.  The Neon Boneyard features more than 200 rescued and restored neon signs from Las Vegas casinos, hotels, and other businesses.  The entrance sign copies the font and style of popular establishments: N from the Golden Nugget, E from Caesar’s Palace, O from Binion’s Horseshoe, and N from the Desert Inn.

This photo was taken on October 25, 2017. Specs are:

Olympus TG-4, ISO 1000, f/18, 1/20 sec, focal length 13.32 mm (35mm-equivalent of about 90 mm)

Halfway

This is our entry in Dutch goes the Photo!’s Tuesday Photo Challenge – Progress.

This photo was taken during a trans-Atlantic crossing from Miami, Florida, to Western Europe.  As well as position, course, speed, ocean depth, date, and ship’s time, the display of progress (“total cruise distance by now”) was shown on the television screen in our cruise cabin. This was the morning of the fifth day at sea, and the first port of call occurred five days later in Malaga, Spain.

This photo was taken on February 9, 2013.   Specs are:

Olympus TG-1, ISO 200, f/2, 1/60 sec, focal length 4.5 mm (35mm-equivalent of about 30 mm)