Even Graffiti Eyes Can Cry — Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Eyes

This is our entry in Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Eyes.

Graffiti is everywhere in Paris, France. What drew me to this street art, sprayed under the shelter of an arch near Place des Vosges, were the eyes.  If I had seen these crying eyes for the first time just eight days later, I would have said even graffiti eyes cried for the burning Notre Dame Cathedral.

This photo was taken on April 7, 2019. Specs are:

Canon 200D, ISO 800, f/3.5, 1/500 sec, 18 mm.

Venus fades to white

Although the Venus dogwood tree is known for its very large white flowers,  its bracts begin as freshly green as the leaves that envelope them. We were pleasantly surprised by the profusion of flowers on our Venus dogwood tree this Spring and are watching the color of the unfurling bracts lighten daily from leaf-green to pure white.  Sometime in the next two weeks, we hope to enjoy the fully-opened blossoms just as we did when the tree was first planted in our yard. (See Venus against a blue sky for a photo from 2017.)

This photo was taken on April 30, 2019. Spec are:

Canon 200D, ISO 1250, f/6.3, 1/500 sec, 135 mm.

This is our entry in Cee’s Photo Challenge FOTD – April 30, 2019 – Dogwood Blooms.

Glass Dome of the Galerie Colbert

This is our entry in Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #43–Less is More.

The Galerie Colbert is a covered arcade belonging to the Bibliothèque Nationale of Paris, France. This photo was taken looking up at the beautiful glass dome of the rotunda. Radiating out from the rotunda are the Institut Nationale d’Histoire de l’Art (INHA) and the Institut National du Patrimoine (INP).

This photo was taken on April 10, 2019. The image was converted to black and white to emphasize the “Less is More” theme. Specs are:

Canon 200D, ISO 200, f/9.0, 1/160 sec, 10 mm.

Everything good and bad about Prague in a single image

We visited Prague this month. The historic area is stunning. Unfortunately, Prague is like Disneyworld on a school holiday. We have attached a photo that shows the good and bad of Prague — in a single image — taken in early April on a cold day.

 

 

 

Die Mimik der Téthys

This is our entry in Dutch goes the Photo!’s Tuesday Photo Challenge – Connections.

Die Mimik der Téthys, 2019 (the facial expressions of the Téthys) is the creation of Julius Von Bismarck that is displayed in the Palais de Tokyo in Paris, France.  Téthys was the sea goddess of Greek mythology.

Die_Mimik_der_Téthys_2019_2859

According to a sign accompanying the exhibit,

The artist picked up a disused buoy just off the French coasts, a form of sign-posting used to facilitate navigation and warn boats of any dangers. Today suspended at the Palais de Tokyo, [it] reproduces in real time, thanks to a complex network of motors and cables, the movement of the buoy that has replaced it.

Because of the data connections between the exhibited buoy and the real buoy, we could “watch” the movements of the real buoy as it was being tossed on the Atlantic Ocean hundreds of miles away.

Man with a Beard — Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: View From the Side

This is our second entry in Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: View From the Side.

While visiting Paris this month, we took in the Palais de Tokyo — a modern art museum. (We had decided to avoid the “main” attractions because of the crowds but read that this was one of the better “second tier” museums. Paris has some pretty high tiers.)

Modern art museums with contemporary exhibits seem to have several that are interactive. One exhibit in the Palais de Tokyo has very large electronic screens that project the profiles of those who stand behind them. We spent several minutes looking at various screens while our fellow visitors posed. One of our favorite subjects was this man:

Attila József by the Danube — Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: View From the Side

This is our entry in Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: View From the Side.

Attila József (April 11, 1905 – December 3, 1937) is a well-known Hungarian poet.  In 1980, a statue to honor József was erected on Kossuth Square in front of the Hungarian Parliament in Budapest. During Viktor Orbán’s tenure as Prime Minister, it was decided to move the statue closer to the banks of the Danube.

Attila József published his poem By the Danube in 1936.  The following is an excerpt (our selection) from the poem, with translation by John Székely.

As I sat on the bottom step of the wharf,
A melon-rind flowed by with the current;
Wrapped in my fate I hardly heard the chatter
Of the surface, while the deep was silent.
As if my own heart had opened its gate:
The Danube was turbulent, wise and great.

And the rain began to fall but then it stopped
Just as if it couldn’t have mattered less,
And like one watching the long rain from a cave,
I gazed away into the nothingness.
Like grey, endless rain from the skies overcast,
So fell drably all that was bright: the past.

But the Danube flowed on.

I am he who for a hundred thousand year
Has gazed on what he now sees the first time.
One brief moment and, fulfilled, all time appears
In a hundred thousand forbears’ eyes and mine.

In the Danube’s waves past, present and future
Are all-embracing in a soft caress.

The photo was taken on April 21, 2019. Specs are:

Canon 200D, ISO 100, f/9.0, 1/80 sec, 35 mm.