Waiting for the science to be in…

We are continuing our class in Photoshop at a local college and are continuing our use of photomontage to learn the features of the program.

The following image, entitled “Waiting for the science to be in…”, is a composite of open source photos (found via Google Image search) and one photo scanned (a requirement of the assignment) from a beach magazine called “LocalLife”. As before, the general theme is being oblivious to dramatic changes in our climate.

After the Glaciers

We are taking a digital imaging class to learn Photoshop. This week’s homework is a photomontage. This is similar to collages we made in art class except for the glue all over everything.

The following image, entitled “After the Glaciers”, is a composite of photos we took at the beach and one image (the golfer) obtained from Google images. The lightning was created using a brush downloaded from Brusheasy.  This is a first attempt and we hope to improve over the semester.

An Early Fall

This is a picture we made last fall for a class on studio lighting. We don’t have battery powered lights, so the lighting setup was powered by extension cords and placed just to the left of the image. The apples were suspended using “invisible” threads. The idea for the photo was inspired by the work of Magritte.

An Early Fall

Silhouette with Van Gogh

This is our entry in Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #62: SilhouettesLens-Artists Photo Challenge #62: Silhouettes.

In April we attended the Van Gogh Starry Night exhibit at the ATELIER DES LUMIÈRES PARIS.   Viewers are immersed in moving images taken from Van Gogh’s works.   Here is the silhouette of a tall man walking in front of “Self-Portrait” (1889) as the projected image moves on the wall.  Van Gogh appears to be exchanging glances with the man as they pass each other.

This photo was taken on April 8, 2019. Specs are:

Canon 200D, ISO 1000, f/3.5, 1/4 sec, 18 mm.

 

 

Ocean City Boardwalk

We were in Ocean City, Maryland, to celebrate the life of the son of dear friends. Afterwards, we drove five minutes from our hotel to the boardwalk on the Atlantic Ocean. Here are a few of the pictures we took as we walked the boardwalk.

Obey Lane Signals: Chesapeake Bay Bridge

This is our entry in Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Signs.

The Chesapeake Bay Bridge (“William Preston Lane Jr. Memorial (Bay) Bridge”) crosses the Chesapeake Bay to connect Maryland’s rural Eastern Shore with the urban Western Shore. With a shore-to-shore length of over four miles and a vertical clearance of 186 feet, this dual-span toll bridge provides a unique view of the beautiful Chesapeake.  The eastern (original) span is a two-lane roadway, while the newer western span has three lanes, with one lane reversing direction during heavy eastbound traffic.  The traffic capacity is 1500 vehicles per hour for each of the five lanes.  The actual traffic volume for the entire year of 2017 was 27.2 million vehicles.  The bridge is used heavily by residents of  the metropolitan areas of Baltimore, Annapolis, and Washington, D.C., who create a huge demand during the summer: eastbound on Fridays to the beaches of the Eastern Shore and westbound back home on Sunday.

According to one source, this bridge has been ranked as the third scariest bridge in the U.S. to drive and the 10th scariest in the world.  There are no shoulders or pull-offs on the bridge, and no stopping.  An accident or a driver too afraid to continue (e.g., with a fear of heights) can snarl traffic for hours.  For a fee ($35 during business hours, addition fees at other times), a 24/7 Bay Bridge drive-over service can provide a driver to get your car across the bridge while you try to relax as a passenger.

The photo below was taken from the middle lane of the westbound span.  The left-most lane changes direction during heavy eastbound demand.

This photo was taken on September 5, 2019. Specs are:

Canon 200D, ISO 100, f/8, 1/500 sec, 35 mm.

 

The Ganges at Sunrise

This is our entry in nancy merrill photography’s A Photo a Week Challenge: Texture.

In November 2014, we visited the ancient city of Varanasi in the northern India state of Uttar Pradesh. We went out in a rowboat on the Ganges River early one morning to experience the sunrise, as Hindu pilgrims have done for centuries. We gazed east, while just to our west, the never-ending funeral pyres burned on the shore. The photo contrasts the texture of the worn paint on the boat with the smooth rippled surface of the water. The solid darkness of the water is broken by striations of sunlight reflected on the ripples created by the oar.

This photo was taken on November 19, 2014. Specs are:

Olympus TG-3, ISO 100, f/2.8, 1/160 sec, 4.5 mm.