A Dilapidated Building — Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Barns or Any Dilapidated Buildings

This is our entry in Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Barns or Any Dilapidated Buildings.

We visited Greece in 2016 and found it full of dilapidated buildings! The following photo shows one we found in the Acropolis in Athens.

This photo was taken on September 21, 2016, using an Olympus TG-4.

The Sky-Blue-White

This is our entry in The Daily Post Daily Prompt: Unfurl.

This Greek flag, unfurling in a stiff breeze, stands watch over the Acropolis of Athens, Greece, on a bright, sunny day with cotton-white clouds overhead. It is easy to see why this flag’s popular name is the “sky-blue-white.”

This photo was taken on September 21, 2016. Specs are:

Olympus TG-4, ISO 100, f/13, 1/400 sec, 8.41 mm

Arch of Hadrian

This is our entry in Lost in Translation’s Black & White Sunday: Structure.

In ancient times, the Arch of Hadrian (or Hadrian’s Gate) spanned a road leading from the center of Athens, Greece, to the Temple of the Olympian Zeus (Olympeion). Constructed in 131 AD by the Roman Emperor Hadrian, it measures approximately 19.5 feet high, 14.6 feet wide, and 2.5 feet thick. Originally, the arch separated the new and old cities of Athens, as indicated by an inscription on each side: on the Acropolis (old Athens) side, the inscription is “This is Athens, the ancient city of Theseus,” while on the Temple (new Athens) side, the inscription is “This is the city of Hadrian and not of Theseus.”

The Arch of Hadrian, sitting beside the modern Amallias Avenue, is an easy walk (less than 2/10 mile) from Syntagma Square, and its main function today seems to be to signal to visitors that they have reached the temple complex.  (The photo below is taken from the Temple side of the Arch, facing Amallias Avenue.)

This photo was taken on September 21, 2016. Specs are:

Canon 100D, ISO 100, f/8.0, 1/100 sec, 18 mm

Mask of Agamemnon

This is our entry in Dutch goes the Photo!’s Tuesday Photo Challenge – Golden.

The Mask of Agamemnon, displayed prominently in a glass case in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens, Greece, is a favorite destination for photographers (and everyone else) visiting the museum. We suspect that, after Heinrich Schliemann excavated this mask in Mycenae in 1876, it has been an object of fascination for more than a century.

Here is the text of the label beneath the mask in the museum.

Finds from Grave V, Grave Circle A, Mycenae, 16th century BC

Gold death-mask, known as the “mask of Agamemnon”. The mask depicts the imposing face of a bearded man. It is made of a gold sheet with repoussé details. Two holes near the ears indicate that the mask was held in place over the deceased’s face with twine.

This photo was taken on September 23, 2016. Specs are:

Olympus TG-4, ISO 100, f/4.9, 1/8 sec, 18 mm

Mount Lycabettus at Sunset

In September 2016, we visited Athens, Greece. This is a nighttime view of Mount Lycabettus, as seen from a higher street in Athens just below  the Acropolis. Lycabettus is the highest hill of Athens. The Chapel of  Saint George can be seen on the top.

iBallRTW-Acropolis at Sunset
Mount Lycabettus at Sunset

This photo was taken on September 21, 2016. Specs are:

Canon 100D, ISO 100, f/5.6, 10.0 sec, 55 mm

 

Pigeons in Syntagma Square — Cee’s Odd Ball Photo Challenge: July 2, 2017

This is our entry in Cee’s Odd Ball Photo Challenge: July 2, 2017.

This photo was taken in Syntagma Square (Constitution Square) in front of the  Old Royal Palace where the Greek Parliament meets in Athens, Greece.  As we waited for the Changing of the Guard ceremony, the pigeons amused us by strutting back and forth searching for stray dropped bits of food. This pigeon showed no fear of us tourists or of the camera sitting on the ground.

This photo was taken on October 4, 2016. Specs are:

Olympus TG-4,  ISO 125, f/5, 1/200 sec, 18 mm

Early Cycladic Harpist and Flutist

This is our entry in Dutch goes the Photo!’s Tuesday Photo Challenge – Music.

This photo was taken in the National Archaeological Museum in Athens, Greece. These Early Cycladic figurines, carved in parian marble, are a harpist and a flutist.  According to a plaque near the figurines, the “Harpist of Keros, seated in an elegant throne, holds a stringed instrument, lyre or harp (trigonon).”  Of the flutist, the plaque says “The musician plays the double flute standing firmly on the ground.” These figurines date from 3200 to 2700 BC.

This photo was taken on September 23, 2016.  Specs are:

Olympus TG-4, ISO 100, f/2.4, 1/3 sec, 5.9 mm