The Cheap Seats at Epidaurus — Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Benches

This is our entry in Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Benches.

This photo shows four tourists seated in the top row of the Great Theater of Epidaurus in Greece. Even though they are 58 meters from the stage, the acoustics are so good that they and everyone else in the theater (which can accommodate 14,000 on 55 tiers of seats) can hear a person speaking normally from the proscenium (stage).  Although a stone bench wouldn’t normally seem comfortable during a long performance, we can affirm from experience that it is a welcome place to rest after climbing up the steep steps from the stage.  (In today’s arenas, these seats would be known as the “cheap seats” in the “nosebleed section.”)

For another view of this theater, see our post at The Great Theater of Epidaurus.

This photo was taken on September 25, 2016.  Specs are:

Olympus TG-4, ISO 100, f/4.9, 1/60 sec, 18 mm.

A Dilapidated Building — Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Barns or Any Dilapidated Buildings

This is our entry in Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Barns or Any Dilapidated Buildings.

We visited Greece in 2016 and found it full of dilapidated buildings! The following photo shows one we found in the Acropolis in Athens.

This photo was taken on September 21, 2016, using an Olympus TG-4.

Stones Suspended in Air

This is our entry in Dutch goes the Photo!’s Tuesday Photo Challenge – Stones.

Meteora, Greece, is known for its massive rock formations reaching into the sky.  This photo shows pillars in the background and a rounded boulder in front.  The car driving beneath an edge of the boulder gives an indication of its size.

This photo was taken on September 30, 2016. Specs are:

Olympus TG-4,  ISO 100, f/3.2, 1/200 sec, 5.5 mm

 

The Sky-Blue-White

This is our entry in The Daily Post Daily Prompt: Unfurl.

This Greek flag, unfurling in a stiff breeze, stands watch over the Acropolis of Athens, Greece, on a bright, sunny day with cotton-white clouds overhead. It is easy to see why this flag’s popular name is the “sky-blue-white.”

This photo was taken on September 21, 2016. Specs are:

Olympus TG-4, ISO 100, f/13, 1/400 sec, 8.41 mm

Arch of Hadrian

This is our entry in Lost in Translation’s Black & White Sunday: Structure.

In ancient times, the Arch of Hadrian (or Hadrian’s Gate) spanned a road leading from the center of Athens, Greece, to the Temple of the Olympian Zeus (Olympeion). Constructed in 131 AD by the Roman Emperor Hadrian, it measures approximately 19.5 feet high, 14.6 feet wide, and 2.5 feet thick. Originally, the arch separated the new and old cities of Athens, as indicated by an inscription on each side: on the Acropolis (old Athens) side, the inscription is “This is Athens, the ancient city of Theseus,” while on the Temple (new Athens) side, the inscription is “This is the city of Hadrian and not of Theseus.”

The Arch of Hadrian, sitting beside the modern Amallias Avenue, is an easy walk (less than 2/10 mile) from Syntagma Square, and its main function today seems to be to signal to visitors that they have reached the temple complex.  (The photo below is taken from the Temple side of the Arch, facing Amallias Avenue.)

This photo was taken on September 21, 2016. Specs are:

Canon 100D, ISO 100, f/8.0, 1/100 sec, 18 mm

Mask of Agamemnon

This is our entry in Dutch goes the Photo!’s Tuesday Photo Challenge – Golden.

The Mask of Agamemnon, displayed prominently in a glass case in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens, Greece, is a favorite destination for photographers (and everyone else) visiting the museum. We suspect that, after Heinrich Schliemann excavated this mask in Mycenae in 1876, it has been an object of fascination for more than a century.

Here is the text of the label beneath the mask in the museum.

Finds from Grave V, Grave Circle A, Mycenae, 16th century BC

Gold death-mask, known as the “mask of Agamemnon”. The mask depicts the imposing face of a bearded man. It is made of a gold sheet with repoussé details. Two holes near the ears indicate that the mask was held in place over the deceased’s face with twine.

This photo was taken on September 23, 2016. Specs are:

Olympus TG-4, ISO 100, f/4.9, 1/8 sec, 18 mm

The Shimmering Blue Gulf of Corinth

This is our entry in The Daily Post Daily Prompt: Shimmer.

The Gulf of Corinth shimmers as we drive along European route E65/Greek National Road 48 after crossing the Rio–Antirrio Bridge from the Peloponnese Peninsula to western mainland Greece.  The blue hills in the distance are actually separated by the Gulf: the first set of hills is Trizonia, a small inhabited island, while the second set is the Peloponnese Peninsula.

This photo was taken just before noon on September 28, 2016. Specs are:

Olympus TG-4, ISO 100, f/6.3, 1/640 sec, 18 mm