Greek Horse Pin Art

This is our entry in Lost in Translation’s BLACK & WHITE SUNDAY: TEXTURE.

A little Greek horse statue, in the Spartan style, was the model for pin art, using a toy that is a popular Christmas gift.  Each tiny circle of light in the photo is the end of a rounded metal nail.  Texture equals art.

This photo was taken on November 11, 2017. Specs are:

Canon 100D, ISO 100, f/5.0, 1/8 sec, 56 mm

Lisbon Door Knocker

This is our entry in Lost in Translation’s BLACK & WHITE SUNDAY: SHAPE.

We found this beautifully-shaped doorknocker in the labyrinth of the Alfama District in Lisbon, Portugal.

This photo was taken on September 15, 2017. Specs are:

Olympus TG-4, ISO 100, f/4, 1/50 sec, focal length 60 mm (35mm-equivalent)

The Front Doors of the Carmo Convent

This is our entry in Lost in Translation’s BLACK & WHITE SUNDAY: AFTER AND BEFORE Y1-08.

This are the front doors of  the Convento da Ordem do Carmo (Convent of Our Lady of Mount Carmel) and its church in Lisbon, Portugal. Directly behind these doors is the Museu Arqueológico do Carmo (Carmo Archaeological Museum). Behind the museum is the  Carmo Church, ruined in the 1755 earthquake, which also hosts archaeological pieces in its nave and apse. The church nave is open to the sky, with only the pointed arches remaining between the pillars.

 

Here is the image in black and white (the after image).

Here is the image in color (the before image).

This photo was taken on September 12, 2017, just before 10 pm. It was converted to black and white using Silver Efex Pro. Specs are:

Canon 100D, ISO 100, f/8, 2 sec, 18 mm

Refectory Ceiling of the Mosteiro dos Jerónimos

This is our entry in Lost in Translation’s BLACK & WHITE SUNDAY: CEILING.

This photo shows part of the refectory ceiling of the Mosteiro dos Jerónimos, a monastery in the Belém district of western Lisbon, Portugal.  This magnificent monastery was built in the Manueline architectural style (named for King Manuel I) and survived the great Lisbon earthquake of 1755. Vasco de Gama, the famous explorer, and other Portuguese notables are buried here.

This photo was taken on September 13, 2017. It was converted to black and white using Silver Efex Pro. Specs are:

Olympus TG-4, ISO 500, f/2, 1/30 sec, 3.33 mm.

Arch of Hadrian

This is our entry in Lost in Translation’s Black & White Sunday: Structure.

In ancient times, the Arch of Hadrian (or Hadrian’s Gate) spanned a road leading from the center of Athens, Greece, to the Temple of the Olympian Zeus (Olympeion). Constructed in 131 AD by the Roman Emperor Hadrian, it measures approximately 19.5 feet high, 14.6 feet wide, and 2.5 feet thick. Originally, the arch separated the new and old cities of Athens, as indicated by an inscription on each side: on the Acropolis (old Athens) side, the inscription is “This is Athens, the ancient city of Theseus,” while on the Temple (new Athens) side, the inscription is “This is the city of Hadrian and not of Theseus.”

The Arch of Hadrian, sitting beside the modern Amallias Avenue, is an easy walk (less than 2/10 mile) from Syntagma Square, and its main function today seems to be to signal to visitors that they have reached the temple complex.  (The photo below is taken from the Temple side of the Arch, facing Amallias Avenue.)

This photo was taken on September 21, 2016. Specs are:

Canon 100D, ISO 100, f/8.0, 1/100 sec, 18 mm

Windows of Hotel Khimsar Fort

This is our entry in Lost in Translation’s Black & White Sunday: Windows.

In November 2014, we were traveling in the Indian state of Rajasthan between Pushkar (site of the annual Camel Fair) to Phalodi (to observe Mademoiselle cranes), a distance of about 370 kilometers (230 miles).  To break up the trip, we stopped in Khimsar, where we had a jeep safari and stayed in the beautiful Hotel Khimsar Fort.  (For more on this story, you can read From Pushkar to Khimsar and A quick send-off from Khimsar.)

This photo was taken through a window in the restaurant (“dining hall”) of Hotel Khimsar Fort.  The image has been converted to black and white except for the stained glass windows visible through the ornate grill.

View from Hotel Khimsar Fort restaurant
View from Hotel Khimsar Fort restaurant

This photo was taken on November 5, 2014. Specs are:

Olympus TG-3, ISO 100, f/2.8, 1/1250 sec, 4.5 mm

The Empress Julia Aquilia Severa

This is our entry in Lost in Translation’s BLACK & WHITE SUNDAY: IMPERFECT.

In September 2106, we visited the National Archeological Museum in Athens, Greece. One of our favorite exhibits was the bronze statue, found at Sparta, of the Empress Julia Aquilia Severa. She was the second and fourth wife of the notorious Roman Emperor Heliogabalus (also known as Elagabalus), who ruled from 218 to 222 AD. (Heliogabalus’ name as Emperor was Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus; he became Emperor at the age of 14 and was assassinated at 18.) The statue of Julia Aquilia is 6 feet tall, and so may be life-sized. The building in which the statue was erected caught fire and collapsed, causing the damage seen.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Julia Aquilia Severa

This photo was taken on September 23, 2016. Specs are:

Olympus TG-4,  ISO 800, f/3.2, 1/20 sec, 9 mm