Budapest 25 October 1956

This is our entry in Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Numbers: Anything with numbers on it.

In Budapest, Hungary, in the pavement a hundred yards or so from the Parliament building, a set of stairs lead to an underground museum called, precisely,

In memoriam 1956. October 25. Memorial and Exhibition

This museum captures the events of October 25, 1956, when the Hungarian State Security Police massacred Hungarian citizens in the square in front of the Parliament building.  A student revolt led to the collapse of the government. However, Soviet troops invaded Hungary on November 4, and by January 1957, the Soviet Union controlled Hungary.  After 33 years, the Republic of Hungary was declared on October 23, 1989, and the story of the Revolution could be told.

The photo below is of the outside of the barrier wall adjacent to the stair steps down to the memorial.

This photo was taken on April 21, 2019. Specs are:

Canon 200D, ISO 500, f/9.0, 1/30 sec, 18 mm.

Obey Lane Signals: Chesapeake Bay Bridge

This is our entry in Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Signs.

The Chesapeake Bay Bridge (“William Preston Lane Jr. Memorial (Bay) Bridge”) crosses the Chesapeake Bay to connect Maryland’s rural Eastern Shore with the urban Western Shore. With a shore-to-shore length of over four miles and a vertical clearance of 186 feet, this dual-span toll bridge provides a unique view of the beautiful Chesapeake.  The eastern (original) span is a two-lane roadway, while the newer western span has three lanes, with one lane reversing direction during heavy eastbound traffic.  The traffic capacity is 1500 vehicles per hour for each of the five lanes.  The actual traffic volume for the entire year of 2017 was 27.2 million vehicles.  The bridge is used heavily by residents of  the metropolitan areas of Baltimore, Annapolis, and Washington, D.C., who create a huge demand during the summer: eastbound on Fridays to the beaches of the Eastern Shore and westbound back home on Sunday.

According to one source, this bridge has been ranked as the third scariest bridge in the U.S. to drive and the 10th scariest in the world.  There are no shoulders or pull-offs on the bridge, and no stopping.  An accident or a driver too afraid to continue (e.g., with a fear of heights) can snarl traffic for hours.  For a fee ($35 during business hours, addition fees at other times), a 24/7 Bay Bridge drive-over service can provide a driver to get your car across the bridge while you try to relax as a passenger.

The photo below was taken from the middle lane of the westbound span.  The left-most lane changes direction during heavy eastbound demand.

This photo was taken on September 5, 2019. Specs are:

Canon 200D, ISO 100, f/8, 1/500 sec, 35 mm.

 

Burning Man at the Renwick Gallery

This is our entry in Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Things Made From Wood.

No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man was an exhibition at the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) in Washington, D.C. from March 30, 2018 to January 21, 2019.  This traveling exhibit brings to life (as much as is possible inside a museum space) the annual Burning Man nine-day event that occurs in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert with 70,000 participant-spectators.  We found the exhibit by accident while wandering around D.C. and just decided to walk in.

The Burning Man sculpture is always made of wood and burned at the end of the event. The first Burning Man was constructed in San Francisco in 1987 and was eight feet tall (or nine feet, depending on the source). Each year the sculpture has been taller, rising to 75 feet in 2018.  The Burning Man in the photo is about eight feet tall, including the outstretched arms.

Of the “Ten Principles of  Burning Man,” “Participation” appears to be the principle behind the naming of the Renwick exhibit: No Spectators.

Burning Man 2019 will occur from August 25 to September 2 this year.

This photo was taken on October 1, 2018. It is a selective color image with only orange, black, and white. Specs are:

Canon 200D, ISO 400, f/3.5, 1/30 sec, 18 mm.

Multiverse by Leo Villareal — Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Lighting

This is our entry in Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Lighting.

Recently we visited the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.   After viewing traditional art in the West Wing, we used the moving walkway through the Concourse to the East Wing, where modern and contemporary art is displayed.  The Concourse is enveloped by the 200-foot long light sculpture Multiverse by the American artist Leo Villareal (b. 1967).  According to a National Gallery of Art webpage,

“[T]he work features approximately 41,000 computer-programmed LED nodes that run through channels along the entire 200-foot-long space… Once the appropriate hardware was installed in the existing architecture, the artist programmed sequences through his custom-designed software to create abstract configurations of light. His programming both instructs the lights and allows for an element of chance. While it is possible that a pattern will repeat during a viewer’s experience, it is highly unlikely. Still, the eye will seek patterns in the motion, a perceptual effect of the hypnotic trailing lights.”

While this sculpture was only intended to be on display for one year, until November 2009, it is still in place and mesmerizing visitors every day.

 

This photo was taken on July 3, 2019. Specs are:

Olympus TG-5, ISO 800, f/4.9, 1/30 sec, 18 mm.

 

Back to the Present in Meteora — Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Back of Things

This is our entry in Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Back of Things.

A Greek Orthodox monk at the Monastery of Great Meteoron in Meteora, Greece, takes time out to check his cell phone.

 

This photo was taken on September 30, 2016.  Specs are:

Canon 100D, ISO 100, f/8.0, 1/30 sec, 50 mm.

Barred Owl Feather

This is our entry in nancy merrill photography’s A Photo a Week Challenge: Unexpected and in Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Anything that Flies.

Yesterday we found something unexpected in our back yard: a feather that, until yesterday, had soared through “our” woods on the wings or tail of a barred owl.  We were not surprised that there are barred owls near us, because we have seen a pair in the early mornings staring back at us (swiveling heads with piercing eyes) and we have heard them whoo-whooing in the dusky evenings (“Who cooks for you?”).  We were surprised at the size and condition of the feather.  This morning the feather was gone.

Barred Owl Feather
Barred Owl Feather