The Luxor Temple Obelisk — Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Columns and Vertical Line(s)

This is our entry in Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Columns and Vertical Line(s).

The magnificent Luxor Temple on the east bank of the Nile River was constructed around 1400 BC. Originally, two obelisks were built just outside the first pylon.  One of the obelisks (the shorter one, although still 23 meters tall) was taken to France in the early 1830s and now stands in the Place de la Concorde in Paris. The remaining obelisk is shown below in its original location.

 

This photo was taken on March 3, 2013.

Hatshepsut’s Myrrh Tree

This is our entry in Dutch goes the Photo!’s Tuesday Photo Challenge – Old.

This sign stands in front of the Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut in Upper Egypt, on the Nile near the Valley of the Kings.  The sign states:

This tree was brought from Punt by Hatshepsut’s expedition which is depicted on the temple walls

Hatshepsut, who ruled Egypt for almost 22 years around 1500 BC, was one of its most successful pharaohs. She was the daughter of Thutmose I, chief wife of Thutmose II (her half brother),  and (officially) co-regent with Thutmose III (her husband’s son with a secondary wife).  (Of course, the true history is much more complicated than this summary.)

The tree in the photo was brought back from the Land of Punt, part of the trade goods acquired during a trading expedition overseen by Hatshepsut.  This myrrh tree, one of 31, was transplanted in front of her mortuary temple.  (There really is the stump of a 3500-year-old tree in this enclosure.)  Frankincense was another trade good from this expedition, which was charred and ground for use as kohl eyeliner, a widely-used eye cosmetic.

This photo was taken on March 2, 2013. Specs are:

Olympus TG-1, ISO 100, f/8, 1/800 sec, 4.5 mm.

Crocodile Mummies — Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Letter M

This is our entry in Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Letter M – Needs to have 2 M’s anywhere in the word.

The Temple of Kom Ombo, beside the Nile River in Egypt, was built to honor the crocodile-headed god Sobek.  Since 2012, the temple has been the site of a museum dedicated to crocodiles. When we visited in 2013, we photographed the mummified crocodiles and still-wrapped mummies there.

 

Temple of Kom Ombo in the City of Gold

This is our entry in Dutch goes the Photo!’s Tuesday Photo Challenge – Yellow.

The Temple of Kom Ombo is located in Egypt on the Nile River 50 km (about 30 miles) north of Aswan.  The city here originally was Nubt, meaning City of Gold. The city gained importance with the building of the temple in the 2nd Century BC.  The Temple of Kom Ombo is dedicated to the crocodile-headed god Sobek and the falcon-headed god Horus. Mummified crocodiles are displayed in the temple sanctuary.

This photo was taken under a full moon on February 26, 2013. Specs are:

Olympus TG-1, ISO 1000, f/3.4, 1/13 sec, 9.6 mm

Felucca near Kitchener’s Island

This is our entry in The Daily Post Daily Prompt: Sail.

This photo of an Egyptian felucca in sail on the Nile River was taken from Kitchener’s Island near Aswan, Egypt.

This photo was taken on February 28, 2013. Specs are:

Olympus TG-1, ISO 100, f/6.3, 1/640 sec, 18 mm

 

View from Kitchener’s Island

This is our entry in Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Gardens.

In February 2013, we cruised up the Nile River in Egypt. One of our stops was at El Nabatat Island near Aswan to see the Aswan Botanical Garden.  Other names for this island are Kitchener’s Island, Geziret En Nabatat (Plant Island), or the Botanical Island.  It is commonly known as Kitchener’s Island because it was gifted to Lord Kitchener around the turn of the 20th century when he was the Consul-General in Egypt. He is the one who transformed the small island into a paradise of trees and other plants from India and other continents. The Egyptian government now owns and cares for the island, which is a popular park for local people and tourists.  The image below is a view of the Nile River from the gardens on Kitchener’s Island. The smaller boats in the image are feluccas, the  traditional wooden sailing boats that provide an enjoyable way to reach the island.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
View from Kitchener’s Island

This photo was taken on February 28, 2013. Specs are:

Olympus TG-1, ISO 100, f/3.5, 1/1000 sec, 6.2 mm

Hathor at the Temples of Philae

This is our entry in Where’s my backpack?’s Travel Theme: Cream.

In late February 2013, we took a cruise up the Nile River from Luxor to Aswan in Egypt. One of our stops was to visit the Temples of Philae on Agilika Island. The Temple of Isis is the largest temple of Philae.  This cream-colored temple is dedicated to Isis, Hathor, and other gods related to childbirth and midwifery.  Hathor, usually depicted as a cow goddess, is one of the most important and loved deities of Ancient Egypt.  In some stories, Hathor is the wife of Horus, who is the son of Isis and Osiris.  Part of the Temple of Isis is the Mammisi, or birth house. One scene on the wall of the Sanctuary of the Mammisi is Isis carrying her baby son Horus.  Around three sides of the Mammisi are columns topped with capitals showing the face of Hathor.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Hathor in the Temple of Isis

This photo was taken on February 27, 2013. Specs are:

Olympus TG-1, ISO 100, f/6.3 , 1/250 sec, 18 mm