Silhouette with Van Gogh

This is our entry in Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #62: SilhouettesLens-Artists Photo Challenge #62: Silhouettes.

In April we attended the Van Gogh Starry Night exhibit at the ATELIER DES LUMIÈRES PARIS.   Viewers are immersed in moving images taken from Van Gogh’s works.   Here is the silhouette of a tall man walking in front of “Self-Portrait” (1889) as the projected image moves on the wall.  Van Gogh appears to be exchanging glances with the man as they pass each other.

This photo was taken on April 8, 2019. Specs are:

Canon 200D, ISO 1000, f/3.5, 1/4 sec, 18 mm.

 

 

Locks on the Canal Saint Martin

This is our entry in Dutch goes the Photo!’s Tuesday Photo Challenge – Lock.

This past April in Paris, France, we cruised  The Canal Saint Martin from the Port de l’Arsenal to the Bassin de la Villette, passing through four double locks and two swing bridges. The photo below shows the first of a double lock fully open as our Canauxrama boat passes through on the way to the second lock.  From the water pouring over the top, we can see that that lock has begun to open for our boat. One of the six pedestrian bridges over the canal provides an excellent viewing point for two passers-by, while other viewers stand behind a railing at the side of the canal.

For some very good photos of the locks and cruise boats from a pedestrian viewpoint, please visit Bushboy’s post Negotiating the Lock.

Twisted at Palais de Tokyo

This is our entry in nancy merrill photography’s A Photo a Week Challenge: Twisted.

We visited the Palais de Tokyo in Paris this past April.  After three hours of wandering through the fantastic exhibits, we were heading back to the entrance when we came across a group of curiously colorful and lumpy objects lying on a stairway and the lobby floor.  The objects were encased in fabrics that were simultaneously sophisticated (shimmering, elegant, textured) and grotesque (tightly-stretched, color-clashing, awkwardly-constructed).  As we stopped to look,  we observed the objects writhe and twist occasionally, in an uncoordinated way.   Expecting to learn that some random movement process was being controlled by complex machinery, we were somewhat (but not very) surprised to see an errant foot appear from one bundle and a head from another, as the bundle occupants struggled to remain hidden while they twisted blindly in place.

 

This photo was taken on April 10, 2019. Specs are:

Canon 200D, ISO 640, f/5.6, 1/250 sec, 18 mm.

Even Graffiti Eyes Can Cry — Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Eyes

This is our entry in Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Eyes.

Graffiti is everywhere in Paris, France. What drew me to this street art, sprayed under the shelter of an arch near Place des Vosges, were the eyes.  If I had seen these crying eyes for the first time just eight days later, I would have said even graffiti eyes cried for the burning Notre Dame Cathedral.

 

This photo was taken on April 7, 2019. Specs are:

Canon 200D, ISO 800, f/3.5, 1/500 sec, 18 mm.

Glass Dome of the Galerie Colbert

This is our entry in Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #43–Less is More.

The Galerie Colbert is a covered arcade belonging to the Bibliothèque Nationale of Paris, France. This photo was taken looking up at the beautiful glass dome of the rotunda. Radiating out from the rotunda are the Institut Nationale d’Histoire de l’Art (INHA) and the Institut National du Patrimoine (INP).

This photo was taken on April 10, 2019. The image was converted to black and white to emphasize the “Less is More” theme. Specs are:

Canon 200D, ISO 200, f/9.0, 1/160 sec, 10 mm.

Die Mimik der Téthys

This is our entry in Dutch goes the Photo!’s Tuesday Photo Challenge – Connections.

Die Mimik der Téthys, 2019 (the facial expressions of the Téthys) is the creation of Julius Von Bismarck that is displayed in the Palais de Tokyo in Paris, France.  Téthys was the sea goddess of Greek mythology.

Die_Mimik_der_Téthys_2019_2859

According to a sign accompanying the exhibit,

The artist picked up a disused buoy just off the French coasts, a form of sign-posting used to facilitate navigation and warn boats of any dangers. Today suspended at the Palais de Tokyo, [it] reproduces in real time, thanks to a complex network of motors and cables, the movement of the buoy that has replaced it.

Because of the data connections between the exhibited buoy and the real buoy, we could “watch” the movements of the real buoy as it was being tossed on the Atlantic Ocean hundreds of miles away.

Le Chat Noir 1881 — Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Store Front and Building Signs

This is our entry in Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Store Front and Building Signs.

Le Chat Noir (The Black Cat) is a  café  – restaurant – brasserie – club in the Pigalle district of Paris, France. Here since 1881, its store front features the red and black of the nearby  famous Parisian cabaret, the Moulin Rouge (red windmill).

This photo was taken on September 17, 2016. Specs are: Canon 100D, ISO 640, f/8, 1/320 sec, 18 mm.