Neon Boneyard — Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Has the letter “O”

This is our entry in Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Letter O – Needs to have the letter O anywhere in the word.

Two weeks ago, we used the entrance sign of the Neon Museum in Las Vegas, Nevada, for our entry in Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Letter “N”. This week we are publishing a photo of another exhibit in response to the Letter “O” challenge.  The Neon Boneyard features more than 200 rescued and restored neon signs from Las Vegas casinos, hotels, and other businesses.  The one is the sign from the famous, but now defunct,  La Concha Motel.

This photo was taken on October 25, 2017. Specs are:

Olympus TG-4, ISO 200, f/4.4, 1/60 sec, focal length 10.7 mm (35mm-equivalent of about 70 mm)

Neon Boneyard — Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Letter N

This is our entry in Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Letter N – Needs to start with the letter N.

This photo shows the entrance sign for the Neon Museum in Las Vegas, Nevada.  The Neon Boneyard features more than 200 rescued and restored neon signs from Las Vegas casinos, hotels, and other businesses.  The entrance sign copies the font and style of popular establishments: N from the Golden Nugget, E from Caesar’s Palace, O from Binion’s Horseshoe, and N from the Desert Inn.

This photo was taken on October 25, 2017. Specs are:

Olympus TG-4, ISO 1000, f/18, 1/20 sec, focal length 13.32 mm (35mm-equivalent of about 90 mm)

Las Vegas Route 91 Harvest Concert Massacre

We like to visit nice places and take interesting photos of enjoyable things to share on our site.  Sometimes, that doesn’t work out.

We booked a trip to Las Vegas in July for a trip in late October to photograph the retired iconic neon signs in the Neon Museum Boneyard. In the time between the booking and the trip, the Las Vegas Route 91 Harvest Concert massacre occurred. We thought about skipping the trip, but we went anyway. We wondered how the shooting would change Las Vegas. It hasn’t, as far as we can tell: they have hidden almost any reference to it except for selling #VegasStrong t-shirts and wristbands on Fremont street. Since this is (currently) the largest mass shooting in American history, we decided to document what we could before all traces vanish.

The shooter was a terrorist who attacked 22,000 concert goers as well as the fuel tanks at the Las Vegas airport. This map shows the shooter’s location in the Mandalay Bay Hotel and the sites he attacked.

Shooting Map

We rode to the north end of Las Vegas Boulevard on the bus (the Deuce). Las Vegas cab drivers often take tourists on long, out-of-the way routes to increase the fare (this happened to us one day earlier and we didn’t want to repeat the experience). Except for the requisite #VegasStrong sign, the hotel didn’t seem to be very different. The only thing we noticed was that the reflective glass on one of the windows the shooter used seemed to have a different tint than surrounding windows. This is shown in the following photo.

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Mandalay Bay Hotel

Outside the hotel, there was a small ad hoc tribute site. Given the number of victims, it seemed too small. It is shown in the following photos.

The concert site where 58 people were killed and 546 injured is nearly invisible from the street.  When we were there, it was surrounded by tall chain-link fencing covered with black plastic. We walked by it once without even noticing it. The following photo shows the best view we could get from an overpass over Las Vegas Boulevard.

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Concert Site

If we tried, we could travel the U.S. and write several blogs a year like this. Since our trip, another horrific shooting occurred in a church in Texas. This has to stop.