The Cheap Seats at Epidaurus — Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Benches

This is our entry in Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Benches.

This photo shows four tourists seated in the top row of the Great Theater of Epidaurus in Greece. Even though they are 58 meters from the stage, the acoustics are so good that they and everyone else in the theater (which can accommodate 14,000 on 55 tiers of seats) can hear a person speaking normally from the proscenium (stage).  Although a stone bench wouldn’t normally seem comfortable during a long performance, we can affirm from experience that it is a welcome place to rest after climbing up the steep steps from the stage.  (In today’s arenas, these seats would be known as the “cheap seats” in the “nosebleed section.”)

For another view of this theater, see our post at The Great Theater of Epidaurus.

This photo was taken on September 25, 2016.  Specs are:

Olympus TG-4, ISO 100, f/4.9, 1/60 sec, 18 mm.

Here’s looking at me … Cee’s Odd Ball Photo Challenge: June 18, 2017

This is our entry in Cee’s Odd Ball Photo Challenge: June 18, 2017.

This photo was taken from the top row of the Great Theater of Epidaurus in Greece. This theatre, with seating for 14,000, dates to 340 BC.  It is unclear just what these tourists are including in their selfies.  Stone steps? The stage far below? Or are they just posing for the photographer, with a backdrop of the upper seats of the theater and the beautiful blue sky?  Or is he just taking a picture of the woman posed to the right?  Or is he taking a picture of us? Sometimes it is important to take a break from ancient sites and just indulge in people-watching.

 

(With apologies to fans of Casablanca …)

This photo was taken on September 25, 2016. Specs are:

Canon 100D, ISO 100, f/6.3, 1/400 sec, 18 mm

 

The Great Theater of Epidaurus

This is our entry in Lost in Translation’s BLACK & WHITE SUNDAY: STEPS AND STAIRS.

This photo was taken from the top row of the Great Theater of Epidaurus in Greece. This theatre, with seating for 13,000 (later expanded to 14,000), was built in 340 BC. The acoustics are so good that a person standing on the proscenium (stage) can be heard by everyone in the theater, just by speaking normally without shouting and without a microphone. As might be imagined, this is a popular activity for many tourists (and tour guides).

This panorama-in-camera was taken on September 25, 2016. Specs are:

Olympus Tough TG-4, ISO 100, f/8, 1/200 sec, 4.5 mm