Monochrome Monkey

This is our entry in Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #70: Monochrome.

In February of this year, we visited the four cave temples in Badami, in the Indian state of Karnataka.  As we climbed to the site, we exchanged looks with this wistful monkey.  We each kept our distance.

This photo was taken on February 15, 2019. Specs are:

Canon 100D, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/125 sec, 31 mm.

Starfish

This is our entry in Lens-Artists Challenge #69 – Seeing Double.

Just eight months ago we were walking on Varca Beach in South Goa, India.  This starfish caught our eye. We didn’t know whether something else (an ocean wave, person, or animal) had flipped it over — there are bird tracks in the sand — or if it had made a very unfortunate move by itself.  In any event, we were struck by the composition in the bright afternoon sunlight.

This photo was taken on February 19, 2019. Specs are: Olympus TG-5, ISO 125, f/4.9, 1/200 sec, 18 mm.

Silhouette with Van Gogh

This is our entry in Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #62: SilhouettesLens-Artists Photo Challenge #62: Silhouettes.

In April we attended the Van Gogh Starry Night exhibit at the ATELIER DES LUMIÈRES PARIS.   Viewers are immersed in moving images taken from Van Gogh’s works.   Here is the silhouette of a tall man walking in front of “Self-Portrait” (1889) as the projected image moves on the wall.  Van Gogh appears to be exchanging glances with the man as they pass each other.

This photo was taken on April 8, 2019. Specs are:

Canon 200D, ISO 1000, f/3.5, 1/4 sec, 18 mm.

 

 

Magic Mirror

This is our entry in Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #60– Framing the Shot.

This young woman is using the selfie feature on her cell phone as a mirror, to make applying lipstick easier.  The framing of this shot, to include the woman and her image, was accomplished by subtle maneuvering from the seat behind her on a subway car.

 “Magic mirror, on the wall – who is the fairest one of all?”

(— from the 1937 Disney classic,  Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs)

This photo was taken on July 23, 2016. Specs are:

Canon EOS 50D, ISO 400, f/2.8, 1/60 sec, 50 mm.

Head of Franz Kafka

This is our entry in Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #59 – Angles.  The challenge is to photograph something from different angles. While the photographer in our case was standing in the same place, the object being photographed was changing angles.

David Černý’s Head of Franz Kafka stands behind the Quadrio shopping center in Prague, Czech Republic.  The head plus base stands almost 36 feet tall.  The head is composed of 42 stacked stainless steel “slices” that can rotate independently, but are choreographed to deform and reform the face repeatedly.  The slide show below shows the state of the head at 5 second intervals; a complete reforming takes 45 seconds.

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The ten images in the slide show were taken on April 14, 2019. Specs are:

Fuji X100T, ISO 800, f/16, 1/30 sec, 23 mm

Old, New, Borrowed, Blue

This is our entry in Lens-Artists Challenge #58 – Something Old, Something New…...

In June, we visited the  America’s Presidents exhibit in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.  Here we found the extraordinary portrait of William Jefferson Clinton,  the 42nd U.S. President (1993 – 2001), created by the artist Chuck Close in 2006.  From a distance, this portrait looks like any other traditional portrait, but up close it is quite different.

 

 

According to the plaque beside the portrait,

“Chuck Close begins all of his paintings by taking a photograph of his subject, in this case an image made during a photo session in August 2005 for a New York magazine cover. He then creates grids on both the canvas and the photograph to replicate the information contained in the photograph with a series of abstract modules.”

In describing Chuck Close’s unique painting technique, Jessica Backus says in The Art Genome Project,

“Over the years, Close’s grid got looser, the squares larger and filled with more intuitive shapes. Close has compared them to Byzantine mosaics, ‘where an image is built out of discrete incremental marks – chunks of stone or glass – that fit together. I want people to see what made the image. I like dropping crumbs along the trail like Hansel and Gretel.'”

We believe that this portrait fits the theme “something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue” perfectly:

  • Something old: Portraits have been painted since ancient times.
  • Something new: The technique used in this painting has evolved to its current form during this century.
  • Something borrowed: The portrait is on loan to the Gallery by Ian and Annette Cumming.
  • Something blue:  Close’s most frequently-used colors are red, yellow and blue.  The color blue is especially apparent in the portrait in Clinton’s eyes and hair.

This photo was taken on June 14, 2019. Specs are:

Olympus TG-5, ISO 500, f/2.3, 1/30 sec, 5.5mm.

 

I’m Taking a Break

This is our entry in Lens-Artists Challenge #57 – Taking A Break.

A popular destination in Myanmar is the Kyaiktiyo Pagoda perched on top of the Golden Rock, which is at the top of Mt. Kyaiktiyo.  The lady in the photo has somehow made it almost to the top of  Mt. Kyaiktiyo, whether by walking or riding the bus we don’t know.  We suspect she didn’t walk, since she has hired a litter to carry her the rest of the way. (The litter bearers literally ran up the steps.)

This photo was taken on February 6, 2017.   Specs are:

Canon 100D, ISO 400, f/8, 1/30 sec, 18 mm.