Freedom of Expression at the Palais de Tokyo

This is our entry in iScriblr’s FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION” Challenge! PHOTOGRAPH!.

A very popular interactive exhibit in the Palais de Tokyo in Paris is a set of white backlit screens. Visitors pose behind the screens for the enjoyment of spectators on the other side.   We spent quite a few minutes here photographing displays of uninhibited freedom of expression.

After a few minutes, it became obvious that the camera, a Canon EOS Rebel SL2 (known in Europe as a Canon 200D), was also exhibiting its freedom of expression. The screens were white, the backlights were white, and the images seen by the human eye were black figures on a white background.  The backgrounds captured by the camera were shades of blue, yellow, green, purple and orange. Not white. The images captured by our other camera, a Fuji X100T, were black figures on a white background, as were the images captured on the smart phones of other spectators near us.

When we have more time, we will try to figure out why the Canon decided to express its artsy side at that time and place: it has not repeated that behavior since.  Was it due to the screen material? The camera sensor?  If anyone else has experienced this false color artifact, or knows why it happens, we would really like to know.

This photo was taken on April 10, 2019. Specs are:

Canon 200D, ISO 6400, f/3.5, 1/250 sec, 22 mm.

Die Mimik der Téthys

This is our entry in Dutch goes the Photo!’s Tuesday Photo Challenge – Connections.

Die Mimik der Téthys, 2019 (the facial expressions of the Téthys) is the creation of Julius Von Bismarck that is displayed in the Palais de Tokyo in Paris, France.  Téthys was the sea goddess of Greek mythology.

Die_Mimik_der_Téthys_2019_2859

According to a sign accompanying the exhibit,

The artist picked up a disused buoy just off the French coasts, a form of sign-posting used to facilitate navigation and warn boats of any dangers. Today suspended at the Palais de Tokyo, [it] reproduces in real time, thanks to a complex network of motors and cables, the movement of the buoy that has replaced it.

Because of the data connections between the exhibited buoy and the real buoy, we could “watch” the movements of the real buoy as it was being tossed on the Atlantic Ocean hundreds of miles away.

Man with a Beard — Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: View From the Side

This is our second entry in Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: View From the Side.

While visiting Paris this month, we took in the Palais de Tokyo — a modern art museum. (We had decided to avoid the “main” attractions because of the crowds but read that this was one of the better “second tier” museums. Paris has some pretty high tiers.)

Modern art museums with contemporary exhibits seem to have several that are interactive. One exhibit in the Palais de Tokyo has very large electronic screens that project the profiles of those who stand behind them. We spent several minutes looking at various screens while our fellow visitors posed. One of our favorite subjects was this man: